Back to homepage

Tag "igbo culture"

History: How Igbos Came to Nigeria and Settled in the South-East

History: How Igbos Came to Nigeria and Settled in the South-East

Eri, the father of all Igbos, who hailed from Israel was the fifth son of Gad, the seventh son of Jacob (Genesis 46:15-18 and Numbers 26:16:18).  He migrated from Egypt with a group of companions just before the exodus of the Israelites from Egypt many centuries ago. They traveled by water and finally arrived at…

Read Full Article
Iwaji Abba: Ancient Festival Made Modern

Iwaji Abba: Ancient Festival Made Modern

Master story teller and literary giant, Prof. Chinua Achebe, depicted the grandeur of New Yam festivals in Igbo land in his epic novel ‘Things Fall Apart’ thus: “Men and women, young and old, look forward to the New Yam Festival because it began with the season of plenty-the New Yam…..The New Year must begin with tasty,…

Read Full Article
Igbos and Culture of Playing Under Moonlight (Egwu Onwa)

Igbos and Culture of Playing Under Moonlight (Egwu Onwa)

Many decades ago; cinema, gramophone, radio, television, and internet services were non-existent in Igbo land, and children had no schools for formal learning, where they could also run around, strengthen their veins and arteries as well as build their muscles. The Igbos of those days, therefore,  instituted the culture of playing under moonlight (Egwu Onwa)…

Read Full Article
Comparative Study Of Igbo and Israel In Print

Comparative Study Of Igbo and Israel In Print

THE widespread notion that the Igbo of the South Eastern Nigeria are direct descendants of the Jews has been a subject of debate. Igbo-men While many ascribe it to the fact that there is a connection between the Igbo and Judaism based on a critical study of their linguistic, archeological, genetic and cultural ties, some…

Read Full Article
New Yam Festival in Igbo Culture

New Yam Festival in Igbo Culture

New yam festival is one of the most prominent annual celebrations in Igbo land. It began in Arochukwu community several centuries ago. In the past, the new yam festival must be celebrated before any adult of Igbo origin will eat a new yam. This means the event must precede the eating of water-yam. The traditional…

Read Full Article
Taking a female chieftaincy title in Igbo land

Taking a female chieftaincy title in Igbo land

Taking a female chieftaincy title in Igbo land used to be a practice exclusively reserved for wealthy, married, and elderly women. But these days, age is no longer a criteria as younger women with sound education, success in politics or business, and high corporate achievements are allowed to  take up female chieftaincy titles. When a…

Read Full Article
Funeral Rites in Igbo Culture

Funeral Rites in Igbo Culture

Funeral rites among the Igbos is a tradition Igbo people perform for any adult that passes on. Igbos believe that any deceased adult of Igbo origin that  is denied the gift of Igbo funeral rites never finds peace in the beyond, and will never be inducted into the world of the souls to enjoy spiritual…

Read Full Article
Ozo Title in Igboland

Ozo Title in Igboland

Across the length and breadth of Igboland, Ozo titleship is a major symbol of prominence. The title-taking event is typically organized with an abundance of yam, meat, wine, and other staple foods - all of which symbolize prosperity in Igbo culture. A close observation of the Ozo title-taking ceremony across the states of the South-east…

Read Full Article